East Yorkshire coastal erosion

Great Colden

Photographs taken by Brian Williams.







more on East Yorkshire coastal erosion
 Great Colden site location

One of the places lost to cliff erosion on the East Yorkshire coast is the hamlet of Great Colden (‘Coledun’ in Domesday Book), latterly referred to as Great Cowden, or Cowden.

The settlement followed a north-south alignment, with worked fields either side. At the middle of the nineteenth century, the cliff edge was nearing the northern end of the main street. By the second part of the twentieth century, the community had retreated inland as the sea consumed all.


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (1)
The lane that once led to Great Colden leaves the B1242 between Mappleton (south of Hornsea) and Aldbrough [10/06/12].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (2)
After a half mile the lane ends at bollards and a heaped earth barrier [10/06/12].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (3)
Looking back [10/06/12].



 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (4-5-6 composite)

 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (4-5-6 composite)


The sketch map offers an idea of the former community’s layout. Land height was some 18 metres above the pictured beach. Distance from the viewpoint reference arrow to the crossroads at the centre would be about 150 metres.


 Cross Keys, Great Colden
The Cross Keys, a public house since at least 1822, with the cliff getting close. No source or precise date is available for this photograph though erosion data suggests the 1950s.


 Cross Keys, Cowden, East Yorkshire
Present day Cowden, with a replacement Cross Keys (in recent times called the Blue Boar but now once more bearing the original name), and with Cowden Holiday Park as neighbour, is located at the B1242 end of Eelmere Lane [23/12/15].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (7)
Across a field from the end of Garthends Lane a Jolly Roger flutters at the edge of the cliff [10/06/12].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (7a)
Public right of way as the cliff recedes into private land should not be assumed – see the notice at Skipsea Withow [15/06/15].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (7b)
Beyond a field in the opposite direction an overgrown disused military firing range also thwarts cliff access [29/12/15].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (7c)
Erosion of the cliff at the firing range sometimes delivers the wrong sort of shell on to the beach [07/11/13].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (14)
The beach at lane end, from the cliff top [10/06/12].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (8)
The beach below lane end, flag as reference [10/06/12].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (12)
Remains of a military bunker [10/06/12].


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (13)
‘Beach art’ [10/06/12].





 Great Colden OS 1852 map

Above, the arrangement of Great Colden is depicted on Ordnance Survey sheets published 1855 from the 1852-1854 survey. An inset shows how the hamlet looked to Joseph Hodskinson, one of three surveyors working on the Jefferys Map of Yorkshire, commonly dated 1771/2.

It appears that the principal way into Colden changed during the period which separates the maps. This was most probably a consequence of late eighteenth century field enclosures.

The brown line across the main map represents the approximate course of the cliff line at autumn 2011. A cliff recession of 293 metres is calculated for the land depicted by the upper part of the map, and 268 metres for the land in the lower part – see monitoring profiles 55 and 56 in the cliff loss data.

Within the plan of the hamlet, some measurement points are marked by red lettering. Information appears in the panel below.

skip data


A [TA 23740 42466] crossroads at nominal centre of hamlet
to
B [TA 23720 42662] opposite grounds of the Manor House
196.83m, -4.30°

A [TA 23740 42466] crossroads at nominal centre of hamlet
to
C [TA 23839 42477] end of east street at entrance to pound
99.19m, 85.22°

C [TA 23839 42477] end of east street at entrance to pound
to
D [TA 23908 42223] Cliff Lane junction with east lane
262.61m, 166.36°

E [TA 23802 42210] end of south street
to
D [TA 23908 42223] Cliff Lane junction with east lane
106.41m, 84.31°

E [TA 23802 42210] end of south street
to
F [TA 23748 42342] angle in south street
142.50m, -20.67°

F [TA 23748 42342] angle in south street
to
A [TA 23740 42466] crossroads at nominal centre of hamlet
124.08m, -2.11°

A [TA 23740 42466] crossroads at nominal centre of hamlet
to
G [TA 23733 42523] roadside opposite front entrance to Cross Keys
57.44m, -5.62°

F [TA 23748 42342] angle in south street
to
H [TA 23767 42298] junction with old road into hamlet
48.13m

I [TA 23595 42430] edge of cliff at end of Garthends Lane in spring 2012
to
A [TA 23740 42466] crossroads at nominal centre of hamlet
148.93, 77.59° (the distance for 11th December 2015 is calculated as 152.92m)

Names in lower case first letters are for convenience of reference.


By taking coordinates to the beach, a street plan may be traced out in the sand, several metres below the level of the former Great Colden. The exercise possibly helps to put a sense of scale to the loss by erosion.

Points B and C now lie beyond the low water line and cannot be reached, but others are accessible when the tide is out.

All pictures in this section were taken 23rd December 2015.


Top left. Alignment D to E, from Cliff Lane along east lane.

Top right. A to G, from the crossroads to the roadside opposite the Cross Keys.

Bottom left. The angle in south street, at F.

Bottom right. D to A, approximating the course of the cliff line around 1960.



 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (19)
View along main street from F. The dog aligned with the marker is a little south of the crossroads at A.


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (20)
The old route into Great Colden (reference Jefferys’ Map of Yorkshire) would have started close to the farmhouse, distance about 760 metres from camera, in alignment with present field cultivation rather than the path as seen. Picture taken near the cliff top, at point J on the OS map.


 Great Colden, East Yorkshire (21)
A patch of hardstanding is one of the last remaining ground traces of the original community of Cowden, or Great Colden.




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